Tuesday Thingers ~ Run for Cover!

tuesdaythingers

Welcome to another week of Tuesday Thingers!  We always love to hear from regular participants as well as new people.

I was randomly (desperately searching) the site for something different and fun to look at this week, and I stumbled onto a few fun pages.  One of them was a page that will show you “All Your Covers” by title, author, or date entered! Find it here.  If the link doesn’t work (or if it takes you to MY covers), I found it by going to Tools (tab at far right), going down to number 9, and selecting the link for All Your Covers.

Questions:  Do you have any missing covers (they show as a plain gray book)? Did you have a favorite view (title, author, date entered)?  Do you have any favorite covers?  If so, is there anything they have in common?

Here is a WebCapture pic of a screenful of my covers:

WebCapture of my book covers

I changed my default cover to the decorative red, blue and brown covers, but yes, I do have quite a few.  A lot are older books where I’m one of a small few LTers with that book and it’s long since out of print, so no cover is available.  A lot of them are ARCs or self-published books and their covers haven’t been entered into the system yet. I have added a few covers to LT, but I’m too lazy to do it for all of them.  Maybe if there’s no cover when I review them I’ll do fix their cover.

A very funny thing:  As I was scrolling down through my covers to decide which screenful to use, my eye landed on a few covers and I thought, “Oooh! I want that book!” then said, “Duh! I have that book.  I have all these books.”

As to whether I have favorite covers or views of all my covers, of course I have favorite covers ;-), but the views didn’t matter.  I didn’t want to put a capture of the “by authors” view because I have a ton of Bentley Little, Stephen King, and C. S. Forester, so the books in those sections would have looked the same and my library uninteresting.  Date added, though, may have been interesting, but I’m too lazy to go back and do it again.

If you’d like to join TuesdayThingers or read other answers, visit Wendi’s Book Corner :-D

Tuesday Thingers -LT Authors

Today’s topic: LibraryThing authors. Who are your LibraryThing authors? What books of theirs do you have? Do you ever comment on an author’s LT page? Have you received any comments from an author on your LT account?

This is an interesting question on a topic I rarely think about. LT Authors have a wonderful opportunity to reach readers, though I don’t think they take advantage of it. I don’t think I’ve ever gotten a message from the author him/herself, but I have gotten a comment from the publisher on the book Firefly Rain. It’s possible they might use the Author/fan thing more if it could be done in a bulletin-fashion like myspace; if they could write one message then click send all and have it post to all those LT’ers who have fav’d them. As to my commenting on the Author’s page, I think I may have once or twice but I’m not sure.

My LT Authors are:
Dave Boling and I have his book Guernica, which I have yet to read.

Richard Dansky and I read and enjoyed his book Firefly Rain, which has been mooched away.

Joe Hill and I have his book Heart-Shaped Box, which is deep in the bowels of Mt. TBR. Point of trivia on Joe Hill: he’s Stephen King’s son ;-)

Penelope Przekop and I have her book Aberrations, which I have yet to read.

Marisa de los Santos and I have her book Love Walked In. This book is located somewhere in Mt. TBR, and I didn’t recognize her name until I saw the book title.

C. Comfort Shields. This is an good example of how Mt. tbARC is kicking my butt. I have her book Surviving Ben’s Suicide, and want to read it, but it just keeps getting buried deeper and deeper. Last week didn’t help my fight against that pile which is entirely excusable, but all the same, I wish I could read faster!

Mort Zachter and I have read and loved his book Dough: a memoir, which has been mooched away. I have left a comment on his LT member page.

As I don’t remember adding a few of these as my authors, it would seem that when an author signs up for LT or when you input a book written by an LT member, they are automatically listed as an LT Author on members who have their books.

Tuesday Thingers – You Got to Have Friends

Today’s question: LT and RL (real life)- do you have friends in real life that you met through LibraryThing? Have you attended any LT meet-ups in your area? Would you be open to attending meet-ups or is LT strictly an online thing for you?

I neither have RL friends who are on LT (it seems I have very few book-reading friends, and those who are bibliophiles don’t have any desire to join, try as I might), not do I have RL friends whom I met on LT (I don’t think there’s anyone within a 50 mile radius who’s on LT).  It would be really great if there were people who lived close so that we could meet up regularly and have a book club. 

I’d write longer but I have company, see my last Sunday Salon.

Tuesday Thingers – Favorite Bookstore

Today’s question: Favorite bookstores. What’s your favorite bookstore? Is it an online store or a bricks-and-mortar store? How often do you go book shopping? Is your favorite bookstore (or bookstores) listed as a favorite in LT? Do you attend events at local bookstores? Do you use LT to find events?

My favorite bookstore is my local Waldenbooks. I do not buy books online (unless BookMooch, PaperBackSwap and the occasional ebay book purchase count). I prefer to touch them, smell them and look at them… are they a tome or a quick read, etc. I live in a small town and Waldens is the only new books bookstore here.

But even if it wasn’t, I love Jan, Sally and Obie so much I’d still shop there if I had ten bookstores to choose from. And I think that is also some of the reason I shop there. It’s wonderful to go into the store and see their smiling faces. They always ask what I’ve been reading and are quick to help me find whatever I need. They give great suggestions, and take mine as well… I’m still bugging them to read The Gargoyle.

I usually run in terror from the bookstore because I know I cannot resist! So I haven’t shopped as much lately. Last time I had to go in was to order Josette’s book since she can’t use the Borders gift card in Malaysia, and I walked out spending about $30… I went in to just orderpeople! I suppose electricity isn’t completely necessary… I could read my books by candle light… but I havegrown fond of it, you know. (TV runs on it and TV keeps kids quiet… puter runs on it, and puter keeps me in books!)

LibraryThing has nothing for my bookstore, so it’s fairly useless for finding events. It has Borders in Ann Arbor, but I’m not driving 3 1/2 hours to some book signing, no matter whose pen the scrawl comes from. I do occasionally attend the events at my store… but again, I can’t walk away for less than $20. The last even was the Breaking Dawn party. I went to the Mummy 3 instead. :-D

By the way, Borders is where I get my gift cards for my giveaways, and where I got the Boogers you can win along with a $10 gift card! Enter to win at Boogers and Book Bucks Giveaway!

EDIT: I’ve got a shirt for you, readerville:
True Bibliophile

Tuesday Thingers – Me Me Me Meme

Tuesday Thingers

What other weekly memes or round robins do you participate in? Is this the only one? Why Tuesday Thingers and not some other weekly Tuesday meme? Or do you do more than one?

Let’s see… I do Sunday Salon, Tuesday Thingers, Viral Video Wednesday (first one’s tomorrow), Booking Through Thursday, Friday Fill-Ins, and Sunday Salon. Wait, I said that last one twice! Sometimes, I get to feeling like I’ve over-memed though.

Sometimes I get to feeling like all I do is blog and not enough reading. This last week I’ve been super busy with back-to-school *oh, joy! back to school!* I’ve been reading the same book since last Thursday, and I’m only half the way through.

SCHOOL STARTS NEXT WEEK! YAAAAAAAAAAY!!!!!!!!

 

Don’t forget to sign up to win a signed copy of Mishka: An Adoption Tale!!  I will post the winner in my Sunday Salon Post!

Tuesday Thingers – Catalogue Me, Baby!

Today’s question: Cataloging sources. What cataloging sources do you use most? Any particular reason? Any idiosyncratic choices, or foreign sources, or sources you like better than others? Are you able to find most things through LT’s almost 700 sources?

This is a fairly easy question, as we are only really given three options:  Amazon, Library of Congress and that German thing.  Amazon is the only one I use except for the rare occasions that my book is so old Amazon doesn’t have a clue or the ARCs that I might have to hand enter.  I never knew there were more than those three, let alone nearly 700.

I use Amazon because I’m lazy.  It’s the first choice, the default choice really, and why would I click on the LoC if Amazon can get me what I want?

Tuesday Thingers -Reco Me This, and Reco Me That

Today’s topic: Recommendations. Do you use LT’s recommendations feature? Have you found any good books by using it? Do you use the anti-recommendations, or the “special sauce” recommendations? How do you find out about books you want to read?
I have looked at the recommendations feature on LibraryThing, but I’ve never went by it.  And the anti-recommender is the anti-Christ when it comes to telling my what I won’t like… I wrote a post about that a few weeks back called Does A Christian Have a Brain?  if read more on that.  The special sauce is interesting but, again, I don’t use it.
Actually, the three ways I find out about the books I’d like to read is:
1.  BookMooch Recommendations -though I’m not entirely sure if it just throws out a bunch of books or if it’s really guessing at what I’d like.  The thing suggests books I’ve mooched and posted, so I don’t know if it has a brain.  At least LT’s algorithm sorta-kinda makes some sense.
2.  ARC sources such as Shelf Awareness, publishers’ and authors’ emails offering me books, and other “free” book places.  Hey, of course I’m gonna take free books!
3.  From my fellow LT’ers and bloggers.  I take your recommendations over an automated guesser any day!  At least you have a soul.  At least you have emotions.  At least you have some sense of aesthetics.  What’s the bot going to tell me?  Because I have Nietzche I won’t like The Purpose Driven Life… which I actually do have in my library?  Yeah…. whatever. (that goes back to the unsuggester is the anti-Christ.)
4.  Jan and Obie at my Waldenbooks… they know me so well! And Jan’s only been wrong once.  She suggested Annie Freeman’s Fabulous Traveling Funeral, but I thought it was just mneh.
5.  My momma.  Though, lately her taster is running on the off-side for me.  Lately she’s been reading about some retired old ladies running a B&B and solving crimes or something… I don’t know, maybe they are killing the guests.  I forget.  Maybe I watch too much Law & Order and read too much Stephen King.
6.  Then, of course, there’s just little me, touching-feeling-looking at the actual book on the shelf and reading the back cover.  However, with Mt. TBR and Mt. TBarc at capacity, I can’t even go to the mall for fear I’ll be drawn into Waldens and won’t be able to resist the lovely books… they want to come home with me…. they jump on the counter and make me buy them….
Okay, that’s enough silliness.

Tuesday Thingers- I’ll swap ya Tuesday for a Sundae

Tuesday Thingers

Today’s topic: Book-swapping. Do you do it? What site(s) do you use? How did you find out about them? What do you think of them? Do you use LT’s book-swapping column feature for information on what to swap? Do you participate in any of the LT communities that discuss bookswapping, like the Bookmooch group for example?

I certainly do book-swapping, how else could I have such a magnificent Mt. TBR? I’m grateful for BookMooch, because without it I wouldn’t have found LibraryThing, and without LT I wouldn’t be blogging. I heard about BookMooch on NBC’s Today Show, when they’d had a segment on free and almost free sites on the internet. The name “BookMooch” was catchy and easy to remember, which is a good thing because it was a week or so before I finally got around to signing up.

From BookMooch, I found LibraryThing through the “LibraryThing add” button. After a month or so on LT, I found out about PaperBackSwap, which is different enough from BookMooch to warrant both accounts. I’m very thankful for LibraryThing, because through the “other places to find ARCs” thread (now ARC Junkies group… YaY!) I found a lot of opportunities to get ARCs, and finally graduated to a blog, and more books than I could read in 2 years snowed in and alone!

I like the LT swap column fair enough, though it’s rarely accurate, and includes the UK only sites in the “books available” numbers. I do participate and enjoy the BookMooching group on LT. My current favorite BM thread is the “Book search for friends” one.

I not only enjoy getting books, but also sending them out to people who I know have been dying to read a book I’ve enjoyed, usually… though there was one book I was so glad to get out of my house (it was the worse book I’ve ever read).

Don’t forget to enter to win a $20 Borders Gift Card… or a $10… and now that there are over 500 entries, a $5 gift card is on the table! If we hit 600, I’ll add another $10, and at 700 another $5! That’ll make $50 in My First Ever Giveaway!

Tuesday Thingers -The Voices won’t leave me alone!

Tuesday Thingers ROCK!

Since we’re past the Fourth of July and the summer season has officially started, what are your plans for the summer? Vacations, trips? Trips that involve reading? Reading plans? If you’re going somewhere, do you do any reading to prepare? Do you read local literature as part of your trip? Have you thought about using the LT Local feature to help plan your book-buying?

My plans for this summer are simple: READ. Read whatever isn’t nailed shut, read whatever is in English (not up for translating German, French, Spanish or Vietnamese… though I have books in those languages in my library.), read all the ARCs on the desk, finish the Jane-a-thon, and making a dent in Mt. TBR by Christmas. READ.

and review,    yes, that’s it…. My plans for this summer are simple: READ and REVIEW. Review all the books I read that aren’t nailed shut, in English, ARCs, Janes and on Mt. TBR. READ and REVIEW.

and blog?    Well, yes.. of course BLOG… that goes without saying.  My plans for this summer are simple: READ and REVIEW and BLOG. Blog my reviews of the books I read that aren’t nailed shut, not in German, French, Spanish or Vietnamese, that are ARCs and on Mt. TBR. plus blog the memes?   Yes, and blog the memes.

Why don’t you join any blog challenges?     Well I did join Fyrefly’s Ye Olde TBR(e) Challenge, what more do you want? I just started blogging!     Well you don’t have to get snippy about it, I was only trying to help!     I wasn’t trying to be “snippy”, I was just trying to get this blog written.     Well you hurt my feelings… you should say you’re sorry for that.     Alright! I’m sorry.     That’s right, you are sorry.     Can we get on with this Tuesday Thingers now? before it’s Booking Through Thursday?     a’right.     Where was I? Right, plans for the summer…     don’t forget about the giveaway!

My plans for this summer are simple: READ, REVIEW, BLOG and GIVEAWAY! I’m having My First Ever Giveaway!! for a $20 Borders gift card. It’s been open for about a week, and I have about 300 entries. When I get 400 I’ll add a $10 gift card, and at 500 I’ll add a $5. Click the pic for details!.

You could be a winner!

 

 

 

 

Tuesday Thingers -PopBooks on LT, p3

 Photobucket

Since some of us in America may be busy or traveling this holiday week, I thought I would keep things simple for Tuesday Thingers. Think of this as “Popularity of Books on LT, Part Three”.

Here is the Top 100 Most Popular Books on LibraryThing. Bold what you own, italicize what you’ve read. Star what you liked. Star multiple times what you loved!

I hope all the American participants have a great Fourth of July weekend!
  1. Harry Potter and the sorcerer’s stone by J.K. Rowling (32,484)
  2. Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (Book 6) by J.K. Rowling (29,939)
  3. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (Book 5) by J.K. Rowling (28,728)
  4. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (Book 2) by J.K. Rowling (27,926)
  5. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (Book 3) by J.K. Rowling (27,643)
  6. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Book 4) by J.K. Rowling (27,641)
  7. The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown (23,266)
  8. The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien (21,325) *****
  9. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Book 7) by J.K. Rowling (20,485)
  10. 1984 by George Orwell (19,735) *****
  11. Pride and Prejudice (Bantam Classics) by Jane Austen (19,583) *****
  12. The catcher in the rye by J.D. Salinger (19,082)
  13. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee (17,586) *****
  14. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (16,210) ***
  15. The lord of the rings by J.R.R. Tolkien (15,483) (partial read) ****
  16. The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini (14,566) *****
  17. Jane Eyre (Penguin Classics) by Charlotte Bronte (14,449) ***
  18. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon (13,946)
  19. Life of Pi by Yann Martel (13,272)
  20. Animal Farm by George Orwell (13,091) *****
  21. Angels & demons by Dan Brown (13,089)
  22. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley (13,005)
  23. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte (12,777) (I think I read this one in Honors reading, but that’s been 15 years ago.  I need to reread it, to be sure!)
  24. One Hundred Years of Solitude (Oprah’s Book Club) by Gabriel Garcia Marquez (12,634)
  25. The Fellowship of the Ring (The Lord of the Rings, Part 1) by J.R.R. Tolkien (12,276)
  26. Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden (12,147)
  27. The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger (11,976)
  28. The Two Towers (The Lord of the Rings, Part 2) by J.R.R. Tolkien (11,512)
  29. The Odyssey by Homer (11,483)
  30. Catch-22 by Joseph Heller (11,392)
  31. Slaughterhouse-five by Kurt Vonnegut (11,360)
  32. Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky (11,257) (vaguely remember from Honors Reading.  Another to be reread.)
  33. The return of the king : being the third part of The lord of the rings by J.R.R. Tolkien (11,082)
  34. Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury (10,979)
  35. American Gods: A Novel by Neil Gaiman (10,823)
  36. The chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis (10,603) (Is this the entire 7 book series? or just Lion, Witch, and Wardrobe?  I’ve read about 3 or 4 of them.) *****
  37. The hitchhiker’s guide to the galaxy by Douglas Adams (10,537) *****
  38. Lord of the Flies by William Golding (10,435) ******
  39. The lovely bones : a novel by Alice Sebold (10,125)
  40. Ender’s Game (Ender, Book 1) by Orson Scott Card (10,092)
  41. The Golden Compass (His Dark Materials, Book 1) by Philip Pullman (9,827)
  42. Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch by Neil Gaiman (9,745)
  43. Dune by Frank Herbert (9,671)
  44. Emma by Jane Austen (9,610) (getting there… It’s next on the Jane-a-thon.)
  45. Frankenstein by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (9,598)
  46. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Bantam Classics) by Mark Twain (9,593)
  47. Anna Karenina (Oprah’s Book Club) by Leo Tolstoy (9,433) (Honors Reading, again… need to reread)
  48. Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell by Susanna Clarke (9,413)
  49. Middlesex: A Novel by Jeffrey Eugenides (9,343) ************* top 5 list!
  50. Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West by Gregory Maguire (9,336)
  51. Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov (9,274)
  52. The Silmarillion by J.R.R. Tolkien (9,246)
  53. The Iliad by Homer (9,153)  *****
  54. The Stranger by Albert Camus (9,084)
  55. Sense and Sensibility (Penguin Classics) by Jane Austen (9,080) **
  56. Great Expectations (Penguin Classics) by Charles Dickens (9,027) ******
  57. The Handmaid’s Tale: A Novel by Margaret Atwood (8,960)
  58. On the Road by Jack Kerouac (8,904)
  59. Freakonomics [Revised and Expanded]: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything by Steven D. Levitt (8,813)
  60. The Little Prince by saintexupryantoinede – 75k - (8,764)
  61. The lion, the witch and the wardrobe by C. S. Lewis (8,421) ( I guess this answers the previous question…)******
  62. A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle (8,417) (partial read)
  63. Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman (8,368)
  64. The Grapes of Wrath (Centennial Edition) by John Steinbeck (8,255)
  65. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott (8,214) ******************  Top 10 favorites of all time.  It’s one I’ve enjoyed sharing with my daughters, too)
  66. The Name of the Rose: including Postscript to the Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco (8,191)
  67. The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne (8,169)
  68. Moby Dick by Herman Melville (8,129)
  69. The complete works by William Shakespeare (8,096) (seriously, now… Has ANYONE read the COMPLETE WORKS of William Shakespeare?  Of the many I’ve read, I love him… I have yet to encounter one I don’t like… maybe Julius Ceasar… he was a “salad dressing dude”.)
  70. Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies by Jared Diamond (7,843)
  71. Me Talk Pretty One Day by David Sedaris (7,834)
  72. The Poisonwood Bible: A Novel (Perennial Classics) by Barbara Kingsolver (7,829) (I think I have it… I’d have to look… I seem to remember buying it recently… maybe not… I buy so many.)
  73. Hamlet (Folger Shakespeare Library) by William Shakespeare (7,808) (Liked it, but not as much as the Scottish Play, witch is my favorite Wills Tragedy)
  74. Of Mice and Men (Penguin Great Books of the 20th Century) by John Steinbeck (7,807) *********
  75. A Tale of Two Cities (Penguin Classics) by Charles Dickens (7,793)
  76. The Alchemist (Plus) by Paulo Coelho (7,710)
  77. The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath (7,648)
  78. The Picture of Dorian Gray (Barnes & Noble Classics Series) (Barnes & Noble Classics) by Oscar Wilde (7,598)
  79. The Elements of Style, Fourth Edition by William Strunk (7,569)
  80. Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel Garcia Marquez (7,557)
  81. The Subtle Knife (His Dark Materials, Book 2) by Philip Pullman (7,534)
  82. Atonement: A Novel by Ian McEwan (7,530)
  83. The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky (7,512)
  84. The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd (7,436)
  85. Dracula by Bram Stoker (7,238)
  86. Heart of Darkness (Dover Thrift Editions) by Joseph Conrad (7,153)
  87. A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess (7,055)
  88. Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra (7,052) (In both English and the original Spanish)
  89. The amber spyglass by Philip Pullman (7,043)
  90. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (Penguin Classics) by James Joyce (6,933)
  91. The Unbearable Lightness of Being: A Novel (Perennial Classics) by Milan Kundera (6,901)
  92. Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse (6,899)
  93. Neuromancer by William Gibson (6,890)
  94. The Canterbury Tales (Penguin Classics) by Geoffrey Chaucer (6,868) ***** How can you not like it unless you’re brain dead?
  95. Persuasion (Penguin Classics) by Jane Austen (6,862) (Two books down the Jane-a-thon)
  96. Anansi Boys by Neil Gaiman (6,841)
  97. The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova (6,794)
  98. Angela’s Ashes: A Memoir by Frank McCourt (6,715)
  99. A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius by Dave Eggers (6,708)
  100. The Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli (6,697) Patial read… for a laugh riot on my failing flailing of The Prince, and to see how much Machiavelli looks like Barry Manilow click here: thekoolaidmom’s 50 book challenge.
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 494 other followers